Endangered gray wolves reappear in California after a century

Northern California is now home to five gray wolf pups and two adults, the first wolf pack documented in California in almost a century.

The last confirmed wolf in the state of California was in 1924, besides the lone OR7 wolf that entered into California in 2011 who is currently the breeding male of the Rogue Pack in southern Oregon.

The California Department of Fish and Wildlife were able to capture images through remote cameras of the pack last week. The group has been named the Shasta Pack for its close proximity to Cascades volcano, according to the Hullabaloo Online.

In May and July of this year, the cameras recorded a lone canid which ignited the CDFW to install additional cameras. These additional tools were able to capture the five pups, who experts saw are only a few months old. They are also connecting the adult caught on tape back in May and July as the one associated with the pack of pups.

“This news is exciting for California,” said agency Director Charlton H. Bonham in a statement. “We knew wolves would eventually return home to the state and it appears now is the time.”

Although wildlife advocates and enthusiasts are rejoicing about the news, there is some concern coming from hunters and livestock producers.

“This is an Endangered Species Act success story in the making,” Pamela Flick, with the Defenders of Wildlife conservation non-profit, said.

“If the public wants wolves maybe they should support the people that are helping feed the wolves,” Jim Rickert, who owns a ranch nearby, said.

As of 2014, the gray wolf was voted as endangered by the California Fish and Game Commission under the California Endangered Species Act. Therefore, any gray wolves that enter the state are automatically protected by the ESA which in turn, makes it illegal to harass, harm, pursue, hunt, shoot, would, kill, trap, capture or collect these wolves.



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