Google Translate just hit a huge milestone

Google Translate just hit a huge milestone

Google Translate has added 13 more languages.

Google Translate has just added 13 more languages, meaning now you can translate in a total of 103 different languages, covering 99 percent of Internet users.

Google added Amharic, Corsican, Frisian, Kyrgyz, Hawaiian, Kurdish (Kurmanji), Luxembourgish, Samoan, Scots Gaelic, Shona, Sindhi, Pashto, and Xhosa, according to a Google announcement. That means an extra 120 million people can communicate through the service now.

Since launching in 2006, Google Translate has continued to add languages every single year, now crossing the 100-languages mark just 10 years later.

The service itself has expanded not only in terms of the languages its support, but also the capabilities of the software it uses. Now, instead of just running text through a translator, you can also have a bilingual conversation by talking, translate images of text, see instant translations with your phone’s camera, and write in a different language with your finger.

There’s also a vibrant Translate Community, where more than 3 million people have contributed 200 million translated words.

Google’s full announcement is below:

From Amharic to Xhosa, introducing Translate in 13 new languages — now over 100 in total!

In 2006, we started with machine learning-based translations between English and Arabic, Chinese and Russian. Almost 10 years later, with today’s update, we now offer 103 languages that cover 99% of the online population.
The 13 new languages — Amharic, Corsican, Frisian, Kyrgyz, Hawaiian, Kurdish (Kurmanji), Luxembourgish, Samoan, Scots Gaelic, Shona, Sindhi, Pashto and Xhosa — help bring a combined 120 million new people to the billions who can already communicate with Translate all over the world.
So what goes into adding a new language? Beyond the basic criteria that it must be a written language, we also need a significant amount of translations in the new language to be available on the web. From there, we use a combination of machine learning, licensed content and Translate Community.
As we scan the Web for billions of already translated texts, we use machine learning to identify statistical patterns at enormous scale, so our machines can “learn” the language. But, as already existing documents can’t cover the breadth of a language, we also rely on people like you in Translate Community to help improve current Google Translate languages and add new ones, like Frisian and Kyrgyz. So far, over 3 million people have contributed approximately 200 million translated words.

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